• End all NZ Super Fund Investments in Intensive Winter Grazing
    Our nation’s global reputation relies on a government that puts the health of its environment and people's wellbeing first. Spending millions of dollars from the nation’s pension fund on farms that practice Intensive Winter Grazing is one of the most unethical choices the Superannuation investment fund has EVER made! In contrast to traditional grazing, Intensive Winter Grazing restricts animals to small patches of land for long periods, which quickly turn into mud. This practice causes freshwater pollution, animal suffering and soil degradation. Freshwater pollution: Nitrate leaches into our aquifers at over 10 times the rate of normal grazing, destroying groundwater for future use and remaining for hundreds of years. Phosphate- and pathogen-rich effluent runs off into streams, rivers, lakes and estuaries, making them un-swimmable, and killing ecosystems. Animal suffering: The land these animals are grazed on turns to mud, which leaves animals with nowhere dry to rest and give birth. They often end up licking mud to get water. Soil degradation: Intensive Winter Grazing destroys the soil and releases tonnes of stored carbon into the atmosphere, accelerating climate breakdown. This practice is heavily dependant on pesticides, herbicides and synthetic fertilisers which are causing severe decline in biodiversity and human health. This is no way to be ‘investing for the next generation’. Please sign and share this petition with your networks Email the minister responsible: Hon Grant Robertson, Minister of Finance. g.robertson@ministers.govt.nz Tell him to; Stop investing any of the New Zealand Super Fund into farms that are winter crop grazing, divest from any that continue, and find sustainable alternatives immediately! #EndIntensiveWinterGrazing
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    Created by Geoff Reid Picture
  • Bring back general tree protection
    All over Aotearoa, our big old trees are being cut down at an alarming rate. They need to be protected. We face a climate and ecological crisis that puts all of our futures at risk, but especially our younger generations. As our towns and cities become more densely populated and green spaces disappear, people are losing touch with nature, and we’re losing the old trees that provide much needed resilience in the face of climate change and ecological collapse. These big trees are home to kereru, tui, kotare and countless other birds and insects - and they provide a priceless community asset, a place of shelter, recreation and connection. They clean the air, they keep us cool in summer, they store carbon and they make great places to play. Up to one third of Auckland's urban trees have been destroyed since the last National Government removed general tree protection in 2012. The senseless destruction of part of an irreplaceable stand of old native trees at Canal Road in Avondale is just the most recent example of why we need to reinstate tree protection. A community protest to halt any further felling has been ongoing there since 8 July 2020. The site, at 52-58 Canal Road, has a unique collection of native trees planted in the 1920s. Even though half have been cut down, over 23 significant trees remain including two rare black maire and a kawaka as well as other natives like totara, tawa, titoki, and puriri. The protest began when local man William Lee stood in front of a wood chipper and refused to move shortly after the first trees were felled. Since then, many have joined him, dozens have sat in trees and stood watch by day and night, and six people have been arrested for peaceful protest. The story has gained nationwide interest and inspired our call for bringing back general tree protection.
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    Created by Juressa Lee