• Make it our Right to Repair
    Are you frustrated that products aren’t made to last and when they break, they are not repairable? You are not alone! A 2020/2021 Consumer NZ survey of 5000 New Zealanders found that 76% of participants would rather get products repaired than throw them out and buy a new one By reducing product quality, and making products hard to repair, companies can sell stuff more cheaply. This fuels trends like ‘fast fashion, ‘fast furniture’ and ‘fast electronics’. As a result, our landfills are filling up, our climate is heating up, and every day we are wasting money replacing broken items that should be lasting far longer. Recycling alone isn’t enough to reduce the mountain of discarded stuff that ends up clogging our landfills. It doesn’t have to be this way! In the past, stuff was built to last, and there were skilled people throughout Aotearoa New Zealand who could repair your appliances, computer or furniture for a fraction of the cost of replacing them. It's time to reclaim our right to buy durable products that are easy to repair. We want Government to hold producers and retailers responsible for the whole life-cycle costs of the products they put into the market. Send a message to Minister Parker and let's get our right to repair!
    138 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Repair Café Aotearoa New Zealand
  • Protect our environment and community and close the Levin landfill in 2022
    While the Horowhenua District Council (HDC) has recently closed the landfill for six months to enable community consultation and address long-standing compliance issues, our campaign is far from over. The Council still has resource consent to operate on the site until 2037. While the landfill is temporarily closed our waste is being sent to Bonny Glen – a compliant landfill near Marton. We want to keep it that way! You can help by signing our petition to protect the Hōkio environment from harmful waste leaching from the Levin landfill. Your support will help us close this non-compliant landfill and repatriate the site which has been degrading the Hōkio environment for decades; leaching into groundwater, polluting the Hōkio stream, and the ocean. In a time of climate change - when communities are cleaning up rivers, lakes, waterways and toxic sites all over Aotearoa – the Hōkio environment deserves a reprieve. We’re Over It because we strongly support the concerns of local Māori who have been ignored and disrespected over the on-going abuse of their rohe for years. We’re Over It - because the Hōkio community is frequently subject to foul odours - with residents’ complaints to the Horizons Regional Council (HRC) not being taken seriously. We’re Over It because the Horizons Regional Council is not being ‘called out’ over its shoddy environmental monitoring of the landfill and the Horowhenua catchment. We’re Over It because the landfill is consistently in breach of a number of ‘resource consents’ to operate in an environmentally responsible manner. We’re Over It because the District Council is not transparent with ratepayers on how the landfill is run. Contrary to popular myth, this facility is running up debt, not making money for the district. Why should you care? Well, if you’re a Kāpiti or Horowhenua resident - it’s your rubbish so you need to know where it’s going and that it’s not damaging the environment. Even if it’s not your rubbish, you should be concerned that in the 21st century any New Zealand community is operating a landfill like this, on a flood plain in coastal sand dune country.
    227 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Allison Webber
  • We want a comprehensive bottle refund scheme for Aotearoa
    After years of campaigning from community groups, waste minimisation experts and councils and with the backing of the Environment Select Committee, we are the closest we have ever been to having a Container Return Scheme (CRS) implemented in NZ! This scheme will have enormous benefits for our community, land and sea; higher recycling rates, more reuse, decrease in litter and green jobs for local people. But we need it to be done right. Right now, vested industry groups are trying to block a comprehensive CRS in New Zealand and have their products (such as glass) excluded. Read more about our campaign on the Kiwi Bottle Drive website and check out the longer version of our open letter cosigned with other zero waste groups and like-minded organisations.
    4,791 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Kiwi Bottle Drive
  • #TakeawayThrowaways for food and drink: End single-use, return to reuse
    Aotearoa New Zealand has a waste problem that we can’t recycle our way out of. Single-use disposable serviceware belongs to the outdated ‘take-make-dispose’ linear economy, which accelerates our global and local waste crisis, fills up our landfills to produce methane and toxic leachate, and increases litter pollution. Extracting natural resources to make endless streams of single-use items is also unsustainable in the face of resource depletion and climate change, which threaten the planet’s mauri (life-force) and our mauri as descendants of the planet. We need visionary personal, business and policy solutions that prevent and reduce waste in the first place, and that replace throwaways with non-toxic reusable alternatives that work for all people. These upstream solutions will create less waste and fewer greenhouse gas emissions than recycling, composting or landfilling. Transitioning to a circular economy won’t be easy; it makes sense to start with low-hanging fruit. While some single-use items remain unavoidable for some applications (such as certain medical contexts, accessibility needs or civil emergencies), most single-use disposable serviceware for food and drink is relatively easy to prevent if we choose to reuse. Many individuals, businesses and communities in Aotearoa New Zealand are already embracing reusables. We can take this further and mainstream reuse with Government policy that removes throwaway options and replaces them with scaleable and accessible reusable alternatives. We recognise that single-use disposable serviceware often has accessibility-friendly characteristics that enable the independence of people with access needs, including the disabled community, the elderly and young children. Reusable alternatives must balance environmental outcomes with the need to maintain and promote accessibility. Government and business must work meaningfully alongside people with access needs to design products and reuse systems that incorporate universal design principles to function well for everyone. For more information, see the Takeaway Throwaways campaign website. *The time to be bold is now. Ko tēnei te wā.* Until recently, phasing-out throwaway food and drink packaging and serviceware would have seemed radical. However, times are changing. New Zealanders want more action on waste. Banning plastic shopping bags was a first step. New proposals to phase-out PVC and polystyrene takeaway cups and containers prove the Government’s willingness to take action on waste. The time has come to be more ambitious: we must tackle the root of the problem, which is the single-use mindset, not the particular materials involved. The Government has a role not only in taking away a wider range of throwaways, but in boosting the availability and uptake of accessible reusables. When combined, these two actions have the power to mainstream reuse. Ultimately, we are all responsible as kaitiaki for Aotearoa New Zealand and the global environment we depend upon. With integrity, determination, and a collaborative and inclusive spirit we can transform how we serve food and drink ‘on the go’, move our country towards true circular, zero waste solutions, and cast ourselves as a bold, global leader committed to a healthier, greener, more caring and connected world. Follow the Takeaway Throwaways campaign and get involved: http://www.takeawaythrowaways.nz/ http://www.instagram.com/takeawaythrowaways http://www.facebook.com/takeawaythrowaways
    5,080 of 6,000 Signatures
    Created by hannah blumhardt